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The Handmaid's Tale

The Handmaid's Tale
73.3333333333

Characters

8/10

    Story

    7/10

      Overall Feel

      7/10

        Pros

        • Well developed characters
        • Realistic settings
        • Deep and engaging characters

        Cons

        • At some parts feels long winded

        Green is for the wives. Dark green is for the aunts. Grey is for the maids. And red is for is for the handmaids. In the unfortunate world of the handmaids, women have lost about every right in book, from the right to be educated & read to freedom of choice. In the dystopian world of the 1985 novel of the same name, women have limited choices; obedience or death. At times, everything felt archaic.

        This past spring, turn Summer, TV land has been doing it. Yesterday, Insecure came back on TV (post to follow). The summer lineup is looking amazing swell, with the return of Game of Thrones, Suits, Preacher, Orphan black and Insecure. There’s a show for everyone. The Handmaid’s Tale was one of the good ones.

        Stick together no matter what. – Offred


        Synopsis

        Without  revealing too much, the story is set in the near dystopian future where birthrates have declined and only a few women can have babies. In USA, there was a sudden a war and the winners are a group that enforces their beliefs onto everyone. Unfortunately, this is the sad case that has occurred through history many times before where those with power abuses religion and causes harm onto others, stating it is for God. From what I know, no religious book asks its followers to harm others – anyway that’s another post.

        Don’t call me that. That’s not my name.

        “Don’t call me that. That’s not my name.” She rejects the name itself because the name rejects her. It denotes the archaic belief that the women belonged to the men. In the Handmaid’s tail, this is literal.  The husband’s name is Fred, so the character’s name is Off Fred = Offred

        Concept

        Source: Hulu

         

        In the Handmaid’s Tale book, Atwood writes about how her time in Berlin, during a time when the wall still existed, influenced her writing and storytelling. She wrote about the paranoia in the air, masked with fake smiles, created a sense of uncertainty. She fed all that into her writing, the coded languages, the bowed heads, the avoided topics in conversations – it was all there.

        You can catch The Handmaid’s Tail on Amazon Prime.

        P.S Stranger Things will return this Halloween

         

        4.50 avg. rating (89% score) - 2 votes

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